Suspension Bomb

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Illustrator Joshua Ramirez

On Thursday, January 28th, Franklin Learning Center administrators issued 140 suspension letters to students in the middle of the day. The chaos that followed led to many complaints, phone calls from parents, and a long line of students at the end of the day.

On Thursday, January 28th, Franklin Learning Center administrators issued 140 suspension letters to students in the middle of the day. The chaos that followed led to many complaints, phone calls from parents, and a long line of students at the end of the day.

Those 140 letters were issued to students who failed to attend FLC’s new Bobcheck program that week. Aimed at improving students’ grades to magnet-school-level expectations, the Bobcheck requires students with one or more failing grade to check in weekly on Wednesday afternoons.

After a practice week, administrators stressed the serious nature of the Bobcheck by sending school police officers around the school, handing out suspension letters to nearly one sixth of the school.

Students were in a panic, running up and down the stairs to go to the office. Some students were especially upset because they did not meet the requirements for suspension.

Assistant Principal Anthony Wilson admits that while they “started with 140 [students]” suspended, by the end of the day that number dropped to “58 because of a human error in the process. Some people didn’t mark [Bobcheck] attendance correctly.” 82 students had their suspensions revoked by the end of the day.

Mr. Wilson concluded, “We want students to recognize that being on track is important. If it’s important enough for us to put our time on it, it’s important enough for the students to join us for it.”

On Thursday, January 28th, Franklin Learning Center administrators issued 140 suspension letters to students in the middle of the day. The chaos that followed led to many complaints, phone calls from parents, and a long line of students at the end of the day.

Those 140 letters were issued to students who failed to attend FLC’s new Bobcheck program that week. Aimed at improving students’ grades to magnet-school-level expectations, the Bobcheck requires students with one or more failing grade to check in weekly on Wednesday afternoons.

After a practice week, administrators stressed the serious nature of the Bobcheck by sending school police officers around the school, handing out suspension letters to nearly one sixth of the school.

Students were in a panic, running up and down the stairs to go to the office. Some students were especially upset because they did not meet the requirements for suspension.

Assistant Principal Anthony Wilson admits that while they “started with 140 [students]” suspended, by the end of the day that number dropped to “58 because of a human error in the process. Some people didn’t mark [Bobcheck] attendance correctly.” 82 students had their suspensions revoked by the end of the day.

Mr. Wilson concluded, “We want students to recognize that being on track is important. If it’s important enough for us to put our time on it, it’s important enough for the students to join us for it.”

Those 140 letters were issued to students who failed to attend FLC’s new Bobcheck program that week. Aimed at improving students’ grades to magnet-school-level expectations, the Bobcheck requires students with one or more failing grade to check in weekly on Wednesday afternoons.

After a practice week, administrators stressed the serious nature of the Bobcheck by sending school police officers around the school, handing out suspension letters to nearly one sixth of the school.

Students were in a panic, running up and down the stairs to go to the office. Some students were especially upset because they did not meet the requirements for suspension.

Assistant Principal Anthony Wilson admits that while they “started with 140 [students]” suspended, by the end of the day that number dropped to “58 because of a human error in the process. Some people didn’t mark [Bobcheck] attendance correctly.” 82 students had their suspensions revoked by the end of the day.

Mr. Wilson concluded, “We want students to recognize that being on track is important. If it’s important enough for us to put our time on it, it’s important enough for the students to join us for it.”

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